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Men discovered that by removing from the nest eggs that they did not wish to have hatch (or that they simply wished to eat), they could induce the female jungle fowl to lay additional eggs and, indeed, to continue to lay eggs throught an extended laying season." ---The Chicken Book, Page Smith and Charles Daniel [University of Georgia Press: Athens] 1975 (p. The Romans found egg-laying hens in England, Gaul, and among the Germans.

Others have decided eggs are filthy food which must avoided. "It is likely that female game birds were, at some time in the early history of man, perceived as a source both of meat and of eggs. Record from China and Egypt show that fowl were domesticated and laying eggs for human consumption around 1400 B. E., and there is archaeoligical evidence for egg consumption dating back to the Neolithic age.

For a time the two forms competed with each other (William Caxton, in the prologue to his Book of Eneydos (1490), asked 'What should a man in these day now write, eggs or eyren, certainly it is hard to please every man'), and the Norse form did not finally emerge as the winner until the late sixteenth century." ---An A-Z of Food & Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press: Oxrod] 2002 (p. In historical times, ancient Romans ate peafowl eggs, and the Chinese were fond of pigeon eggs.

Sanders identified the potential of the restaurant franchising concept, and the first "Kentucky Fried Chicken" franchise opened in Utah in 1952.

KFC popularized chicken in the fast food industry, diversifying the market by challenging the established dominance of the hamburger. KFC was one of the first American fast food chains to expand internationally, opening outlets in Canada, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Jamaica by the mid-1960s.

["Shenandoah"] probably came from the American or Canadian voyageurs, who were great singers ....

is an American fast food restaurant chain that specializes in fried chicken.

Until the 19th century only adventurers who sought their fortunes as trappers and traders of beaver fur ventured as far west as the Missouri River.